Yoga for Foot Pain

While feet balance our body, yoga helps to balance our mind, body, and spirit. Discomfort is never ideal for this practice, but yoga for foot pain can help!

You know the beauty and benefits of yoga. That’s why it can feel surprising when you start feeling pain from the asanas that used to bring balance and calm to your body. Foot pain can jeopardize our yoga practice.

Sometimes as yogis, we try to work through it on the mat. The key is to focus on standing poses which can help bring awareness to your feet. Go ahead and use yoga for foot pain enlightenment.

Where do I begin? 

Mountain pose is the basis for all other standing poses, like eagle pose and tree pose. Starting with a strong base enables variation and allows you to challenge yourself while being placed in a steady pose.

To help you work through the pain in your feet, try positioning yourself in mountain pose, pay attention to your body, and ask these questions:

1. Are you putting more weight on one leg over the other? Bring your mind’s attention to your legs and check in with each one. If you feel more weight in one, then try to balance your weight distribution, shifting gently until you feel even.

2. Where do you feel the weight in your feet? Does it feel as though your ankles might be rolling inward or outward? Do you notice the weight more on the inside or outside of your feet? Work on adjusting your body so that you’re not leaning more on one side than the other to ensure that your feet are stabilized.

3. How do your toes feel? Are you feeling unstable while standing in mountain pose? If you do feel unstable, then spread your toes. This simple movement gives you more balance and provides a stronger grip.

How can I utilize other poses for my feet? 

More poses you can practice that put the focus and benefits on your feet are:

  1. Hero Pose, Thunderbolt Pose, and Broken Toe Pose—These are all similar poses; however, for Broken Toe Pose, your toes are tucked under (including your pinky toes), which can help stretch the bottom of the foot length.
  2. Standing Forward Fold—It starts off by stretching and releasing the tension in your lower back. As you straighten your legs, eventually your feet, calves, and hamstrings will experience a good stretch too.
  3. Downward Facing Dog—This is an incredible full body stretch involving the legs, calves, and feet. It’s truly a great stretch!

Do you feel balanced yet? 

These poses focus on improvement in balance and stability, while strengthening the muscles around your feet and ankles. Of course, your flexibility will increase as well. Even though these poses are simple yoga variations, going back to basics can truly assist you in utilizing yoga for foot pain. As an added bonus, these poses demonstrate how to relieve that pain, ultimately leading to a stronger foundation for your entire body.

Foot pain getting in the way of your yoga practice? Take care of yourself, and check in with us.

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